Reducing highway noise in built up areas

The Maju Expressway (MEX) linking Kuala Lumpur with Putrajaya as in many urban highways cut across highly built up residential areas. This can potentially can result in unacceptable noise to residents if left unaddressed.
We were involved in the design development of the MEX highway, and there were several residential locations of concern. Amongst one of the locations, the highway runs over an existing local road in Sri Petaling. From noise modeling we were able to design noise barriers to ensure that the MEX does not contribute to existing noise in the areas below. As such noise from the MEX highway was rendered inaudible to these residential houses.

For high rise building located adjacent the highway, noise barriers can only be effective as long as there is no line of sight to the highway below. In this instance additional measures were implemented with low noise porous asphalt roads as compared to conventional bitumen (and certainly avoiding con‐ crete pavements). Noise intrusion into bedrooms of affected apartments at different floors were also examined from traffic noise intrusion via the glazing.

“You come highly recommended by LLM (Malaysian Highway Authority)”

Richard Whitehead
Project Director
Leighton Contractors (M) Sdn Bhd Comments made during UTM’s appointment.

From left to right: Model of MEX Interchange at Bukit Jalil | Predicted noise levels inside apartments from traffic noise

From left to right: Model of MEX Interchange at Bukit Jalil | Predicted noise levels inside apartments from traffic noise



From left to right: Cross section showing MEX highway over Sri Petaling | Typical results of noise modeling showing noise propagation to residents from MEX and local road

From left to right: Cross section showing MEX highway over Sri Petaling | Typical results of noise modeling showing noise propagation to residents from MEX and local road